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Some Democratic Legislatures had approved of the Kansas Bill; others had condemned it.

Until, therefore, the National Democratic Convention which was to meet in the summer of 1856 to nominate a candidate for the Presidency, had authoritatively announced itself in favor of the principle embodied in the Kansas Law, the Anti-Nebraska Democrats still claimed to be considered members of the party, although Douglas in his speeches and by his press-organs had already denounced them as traitors, as Abolitionists and Disunionists.

This agitation, at a time which was usually a very quiet one, (no elections pending,) was a prelude, however, to the stormy year of 1856.

The situation of the parties about this time was very peculiar. It could count only on temporary victories in the State elections.

Their number, however, was comparatively small, though large enough to create much prejudice against the new party.

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We outsiders hope you will make the fight." The Democratic State Convention in May, under the influence of Douglas, the pressure of the administration, and the very strong feeling against the Abolitionists in the south of the State, which was transferred, as was expected, to the Republicans, endorsed Douglas's repeal of the Missouri Compromise and his phantom "Squatter Sovereignty," nominated William A.

"The idea," I said, "that the Constitution of the freest country on earth carries slavery wherever its flag is unfurled, I hold in utter abhorrence." But, I said further, that, while I feared that both the State and National Conventions, soon to be held, would endorse the Kansas-Nebraska Act, with all that it implied, yet, as these conventions, in which by common usage was lodged the authority to bind the party to the principles enunciated in its platform, had not yet spoken, I felt that, under the peculiar circumstances of the case, especially since I had been so often honored by that great party and now held a high position by their voices, I could not as yet sever the ties which so long had connected me with it.

Should these meetings, however, act as I feared they would, I would then willingly join a new party, which should, however, be more than a temporary opposition-party.

It may share in the emoluments of office, but can do no good.

A new party should meet all the important political issues clearly and distinctly, without mental reservation.

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